DR Rui Zhou

DR Rui Zhou

Positions

  • Longevity/mortality risk measurement and management; Mortality modeling and forecasting; Longevity annuity; Weather derivative

Overview

OverviewText1

  • Rui Zhou holds a Ph.D. degree in Actuarial Science from the University of Waterloo and is a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries (FSA) and an Associate of the Canadian Institute of Actuaries (ACIA). Prior to joining the University of Melbourne, she was Assistant Professor in Actuarial Studies at the University of Manitoba for five years. Her research focuses on the management of mortality and longevity risk. She has proposed new pricing methods for longevity/mortality-linked securities and developed multi-population mortality models that facilitate the analysis of these securities. She has recently gained interest in weather risk management. In particular, she is interested in the application of weather derivatives in various business sectors. Rui has been publishing in high quality actuarial journals such as the Journal of Risk and Insurance, Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, and the North American Actuarial Journals. She is also a frequent speaker at the International Longevity Risk and Capital Markets Solutions Conference.    

Publications

Selected publications

Research

Additional Grant Information

  • Canadian Institute of Actuaries Academic Research Grant, Canadian Institute of Actuaries 04/2017-12/2018 Components of historical mortality improvement, Society of Actuaries 08/2016-08/2017 Discovery Grant, National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada 04/2015-12/2017 University Research Grant Program, University of Manitoba 01/2014-06/2015    

Awards

Education and training

  • Phd, University of Waterloo 2013
  • Master, University of Waterloo 2008
  • Bachelor, Renmin University of China 2007

Awards and honors

  • Not in List, 2016

Supervision

Available for supervision

  • Y

Supervision Statement

  • Professor Zhou is available to supervise in the areas of longevity risk management and mortality modelling.