DR Peregrine Osborne

DR Peregrine Osborne

Positions

  • Neural control of lower urinary tract organs (Urology, Bladder, Urethra, Micturition, Storage, Voiding)
  • Neuroanatomy of visceral interoception (Spinal cord, Brain, Neuroanatomy, Connectome)
  • Peripheral and central mechanisms of pelvic and visceral sensation and pain (Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology, Neuropharamcology)
  • Understanding functional connectivity of sensory and motor pathways to specific regions of the lower urinary tract (Visceral nervous system, Spinal cord, Primary afferents, Pain mechanisms, Neuroanatomy, Neuromodulation)

Overview

OverviewText1

  • Peregrine Osborne’s research addresses the organisation, function and pharmacological regulation of nervous system networks that have visceral sensory or motor functions in the body. After studying zoology and graduating with a BSc(Hons) and PhD from the University of Melbourne, he completed his postdoctoral training at the Vollum Institute (Portland, Oregon, USA). There, in the laboratory of Alan North FRS, he contributed to important early electrophysiological characterisation of the newly cloned mammalian voltage-gated potassium channels; and then with John Williams continued his training in brain slice electrophysiology and neuropharmacology while studying opioid regulation of the locus coeruleus. His research on opioid neuropharmacology expanded to other brain systems in the laboratory of MacDonald Christie after returning to Australia as a University of Sydney Rolf Edgar Lake Fellow. This was continued as an independent research fellow at the University of Queensland and Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute at the University of New South Wales. He was then recruited as Group Leader to the University of Sydney Pain Management Research Institute, and his research expanded to address biological mechanisms of analgesia and hyperalgesia in the context of chronic pain. There he was a Chief Investigator on a NSW Office for Science and Medical Research Spinal Cord Injury and Other Neurological Conditions Program Grant addressing “Pain following spinal cord injury (SCI): Understanding mechanism to develop treatments”. He also was co-investigator on a study investigating the effects of estrogen on bladder pain funded by the US NIH/NIDDK (PI: J Keast). In 2012, Peregrine relocated to the Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience at the University of Melbourne with his collaborator Janet Keast. Making use of his postgraduate training in autonomic neuroscience combined with his extensive experience studying organisation and function of nerve circuits,    

Publications

Selected publications

Research

Additional Grant Information

  • We are supported by the National Institutes of Health SPARC common fund program and have also contributed to the GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project database (GUDMAP) program funded by the US National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), which aims to provide a fundamental description of the developing kidney and GU tract.   

Awards

Education and training

  • PhD, University of Melbourne 1992
  • BSc (Hons), University of Melbourne 1988

Linkages

Supervision

Available for supervision

  • Y

Supervision Statement

  • Voiding and reproduction are important human functions that require complex reflexes to occur at behaviourally appropriate times. The pelvic nervous system is the neural interface used by the brain to exert control over the relevant visceral and somatic systems. Our goal is help develop neuromodulation and other therapies to treat human clinical conditions affecting these functions. To do this, our research is determining how the pelvic nervous system develops; how it controls complex bodily functions such as voiding or reproduction; and how it might be manipulated to provide clinical treatments in diverse medical specialties including urology, gastroenterology, sexual medicine, neurology and pain medicine. Our multidisciplinary approach uses rodent models and human samples to study the development, anatomy, and function of the pelvic nervous system, which comprises major subdivisions of the • parasympathetic and sympathetic autonomic nervous system • pelvic somatosensory and visceral sensory systems • sacral and lumbar spinal cord • and connectivity with high order brain centres. We use advanced microscopic imaging and neuroanatomical techniques extensively in our work, but are also expert in other approaches such as primary cell culture (including co-cultures of adult neurons and urothelial cells), cellular neurophysiology and neuropharmacology, and bioinformatics analysis of specific neural populations. We are supported by the National Institutes of Health SPARC common fund program and have also contributed to the GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project database (GUDMAP) program funded by the US National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), which aims to provide a fundamental description of the developing kidney and GU tract. Techniques performed in laboratory: neuropharmacology, patch clamp electrophysiologiy, neuronal cell culture, live cell imaging, confocal microscopy, brain mapping (in rodents), behav